Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Toyota Passo and Daihatsu Boon - Second Generation F/L

2015 Daihatsu Boon

2015 Toyota Passo

2015 Toyota Passo

The second generation Toyota Passo and the Daihatsu Boon may have been around for four years since their 2010 regeneration but these looks never make the grade and remained exclusive to the Japanese market as of now. Now, both these models underwent a minor change and this time, the updated second-generation Passo and Boon are now fuel efficient than even because they're now have a brand-new 1.0L petrol engine equipped which is 30% fuel efficient than the outgoing engine it replaces.

2015 Daihatsu Boon interior

Although the engine still retains the 1KR-FE designation, this brand new engine is developed jointly with Daihatsu. It achieves a maximum thermal efficiency of 37% thanks to the use of a tumble flow-generating intake, cooled EGR system, and an improved compression ratio. Couple that with the idling stop feature and the result is a record-high 27.6km/L fuel consumption as calculated by JC08 Mode standards. That's 30% more than the last one.

Of course, you can expect the new 1KR-FE engine to be equipped in both the Passo and the Boon but the 1.3L 1NR-FE Dual VVT-i engine? That's only available for the Passo (in normal and +Hana versions). The 1.3L petrol engine still develops a modest 95PS of power and 121Nm of torque while its fuel consumption is a meager 19.0km/L.

2015 Daihatsu Boon interior

2015 Daihatsu Boon interior

2015 Toyota Passo interior

2015 Toyota Passo interior

Of course, since both the Passo and Boon are low-cost Japanese eco boxes made for the average of customers, you can still expect the plasticky interior. Even though it has a radio and an aircon, it still feels like a low-cost car. However, in the +Hana versions of the Passo, the cozy two-tone seating really covers up its low-cost interior perhaps but even though with the +Hana, it's still feels cheap and you don't get the excitement that you get from other compacts.

Price wise, the new Passo costs from 1,098,655 to 1,652,400 Japanese Yen (estimated $11,000 to $17,000) while the Boon costs 1,263,600 to 1,549,800 Japanese Yen (estimated $13,000 to $15,500). You know both of these were manufactured at Daihatsu's Ikeda Plant in Osaka but why is the Boon costs more than its Toyota equivalent, the Passo, even though it doesn't have a high-end model and a 1.3L engine?

In the meantime, even though the updated versions are still terrible for the enthusiasts too many, the pricing is a fair start in the compact hatchback market in Japan.

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